LifeLine Newsletter

2019 September LifeLine

PAIN IN THE BRAIN, DON’T SMOKE COCAINE
YOUR MONEY GOES IN VAIN AND COCAINE DESTROYS YOUR BRAIN
SOME ADDICTS NOT WORKING,
THEY ONLY STEALING TO SUPPORT AND MAINTAIN
YOU HAVEN’T GOT NO MONEY IN YOUR POCKET
BUT YOU FEELING LIKE A MILLIONAIRE
WHEN COCAINE IS THERE
SOCIETY USES ADDICTS TO SUPPORT THEM
AND WHEN THEY HAVE NO OTHER , THEY DON’T KNOW THEM.
EMANCIPATE YOURSELF FROM MENTHOL SLAVERY
IF THE COCAINE DON’T KILL YOU
THE LIFE STYLE WILL.

From Kameel S. Trinidad WI

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CELEBRATING ANNIVERSARIES

I recently attended an anniversary and the celebrant had about 15 speakers, I asked myself “Self, what’s with all of those speakers? And who would have time to carry an effective message?”

Another question that I ask myself is : Is the individual trying to People please? Is the Individual incapable of saying no? I believe that in order to carry a effective message you need more than 5 minuets. What has happened to 4 to 6 speakers in an anniversary? One of the things I have told my sponsee is that I do not have to lead or speak I can read.

I do not sponsor people so that at the end of the year when my anniversary comes around you can lead or speak. It’s a celebration not a graduation, and I am talking about me and how I see it. This is just my opinion and I do not have all the answers.

When I celebrate I will have 4 to 5 speakers so that they will have time to carry an effective message. Did you ever notice that at some anniversaries as soon as the speaker is getting into the message he or she is stopped? Why? Because the individual had only 4 to 5 minutes to carry the message.

Just My Opinion. As an addict once said “I am impressed with everyone’s recovery, I am impressed with Narcotics Anonymous.

My Name is Trevor, and I am a Addict in Recovery.

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Are You A… Traditionalist?

We keep what we have only with vigilance, and just as freedom for the individual comes from the Twelve Steps, so freedom for the groups springs from our Traditions. As long as the ties that bind us together are stronger than those that would tear us apart, all will be well. We hear these two sentences read frequently – at every service meeting, at many recovery meetings… maybe we’ve heard them so often we have become desensitized to them and the role the Traditions play in the continued existence of Narcotics Anonymous.

We seem to forget that there are spiritual principles behind the Traditions, just as there are spiritual principles behind the Steps. We also forget that being in service is part of the “practice these principles in all our affairs” we promise to do in Step Twelve. We do service for three reasons: To combat the self-centeredness at the core of our disease that wants to see us dead; To give away what was so freely given to us by carrying this message to the still-suffering addict and; To save lives. Ultimately, we are here because the message was carried to us.

We stay here because we fell in love with the message, we embraced the message, we love it so much we want to stay as close as possible to the message. If that’s the case, if you agree with that, if you identify with that, here is the question to ask yourself: How often, in any service meeting, in any service capacity, are you practicing the spiritual principles behind the Traditions – in every single service affair in your life?

How frequently do you welcome the person new to service and encourage them, mentor them, support them, while they figure out where they fit and whether they have anything to offer? How frequently do you address shortcomings, mistakes, missteps, in a loving fashion that doesn’t shame, humiliate, intimidate, or bully?

When you are at a service meeting, are you truly present or are you having side conversations and only half-listening to information you may need to convey to others afterwards? Are you prepared or do you think you’re doing everyone a favor by showing up?

Are you taking it seriously, this business of carrying our message and saving lives or are you “phoning it in”? If you have “a lot” of service experience and “a lot” of clean time, are you mindful of being an example to those who are new to service with less clean time than you? Are you patient with them? Do you help them? Do you remember what you were like when you started serving?

If you have only “a little” service experience and “a little” clean time, are you listening and paying attention or have you already decided that everyone is doing it wrong and you’re gonna fix everything? Are you asking for help and looking for an older, more experienced member to bounce things off of or do you think you don’t need the benefit of someone else’s experience?

When we come together to serve, we bring all our baggage and we bring all our recovery. Coming together in a service capacity provides an opportunity for us to work through our baggage in a place that is meaningful for us because of all the program has given us. Those of us who serve do so because we want to give what was given to us but we may struggle doing so in a manner that is in keeping with the spiritual principles we want to embody. We get to utilize one of the most important principles: freedom.

We are free to choose how we enter into service – whether we treat everyone with whom we serve with respect or disdain – regardless of how we feel about them, regardless of how well they live up to the promise they made when they asked us to elect them. I certainly have my fair share of amends to make, due to my arrogance and impatience. Are we, as trusted servants, taking our inventory regarding how we serve and how we treat our fellow trusted servants? When people serve with us, do they want to do more service with us or do we drive them away?

Do we trust our trusted servants or do we interrogate them and look for fault at every opportunity? I know we like to accuse people who don’t serve of being ungrateful, selfish, or apathetic. What if they’re protecting themselves from our abuse and toxicity? What if doing service with us is bad for their recovery? What if our baggage is making it impossible for them to find a place at the table? I’ll end this little essay by asking the question again:

How often, in any service meeting, in any service capacity, are you practicing the spiritual principles behind the Traditions – in every single service affair in your life?

  • Tradition One: Unity
  • Tradition Two: Trust
  • Tradition Three: Tolerance, Identity
  • Tradition Four: Autonomy, Responsibility
  • Tradition Five: Purpose
  • Tradition Six: Solidarity
  • Tradition Seven: Integrity
  • Tradition Eight: Fellowship
  • Tradition Nine: Structure
  • Tradition Ten: Neutrality
  • Tradition Eleven: Anonymity
  • Tradition Twelve: Sacrifice

Respectfully Submitted, Lynne V’

Disclaimer: Articles submitted for publication are the solely expressed opinion of the author and not that of BASCNA or NA as a whole. The Lifeline reserves the right to edit any article received for print. We will not print anything that attacks another persons individual character or beliefs.

2019 September Lifeline
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